Monday, December 10, 2012

kumpulan skripsi bahasa inggris THE SECOND YEAR STUDENTS’ MOTIVATION IN LEARNING ENGLISH AT SMPN 4 MATARAM

THE SECOND YEAR STUDENTS’ MOTIVATION IN LEARNING ENGLISH AT SMPN 4 MATARAM IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2009/2010



CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION
1.1 Background of study
Many factors affect students’ successful in learning. Motivation of English learners was regarded as one of the most important aspect to determine the successful learning. It was believed that students with higher motivation of learning foreign languages tend to perform better than those who have low motivation (Chang 2005). The first summary of L2 motivation research was first proposed by Robert Gardner and Wallance Lambert in 1972. Motivation is commonly considered to be an inner drive, impulse, emotion or desire that moves one to apparticular action; or “In a general sense, motivation can be defined as the dynamically changing cumulative arousal in a person that initiates, directs, coordinates, amplifies, terminates, and evaluates the cognitive and motor processes whereby initial wishes and desires are selected, prioritized, operationalised and (successfully or unsuccessfully) acted out” (Dornyei, 1998). Gardener defined “motivation” as “the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language plus favorable attitudes towards learning the language”.
According to Keller, motivation is “the choices people make as to what experiences or goals they will approach or avoid and the degree of effort they will exert in that expect” (Keller, 1983). It has an undoubted evident effect on second language teaching and learning and it is generally accepted as one of the major determinants of second language teaching and learning.
Motivation is the process whereby goal-directed activity is instigated and sustained (Pintrich & Schunk, 2002), it is one of the keys that influence the rate and success of language learning (Dorney, 1998). Virtually all language teachers want to motivate their students to study languages.
The Indonesia government has been aware of the importance English. It is really realized that English plays an important role in international interaction. Having qualified in English now days might give wide opportunities to get a good jobs are as one of its requirement. The conditions lead learners to another motivation to learn English. They learn English not only for the shake of their rank in the class but also for future purposed that is to enable them to get jobs. This condition rises up the learners’ motivation to study English. Based on the explanation the teacher has the importance role to motivate the students learned including facilitating, guiding and showing something to learn.
1.2 Statement of problem
                        The research is intended to answer the following research question:
1.      What is the students’ motivation in learning English?
2.      What factors that influence the students’ motivation in learning English?

1.3 Purpose of study
The purposes of this study are:
1.      To find out the students’ motivation in learning English
2.      To identify the factors influencing the students’ motivation in learning English.
1.4 Assumption of study
1.      Student’s have the same background of learning.
2.      In the teaching the are many various efforts have been used by teacher to increase the motivation.
1.5 Scope of study
Based on the researcher determined the scope of this research that was directed to find out the kind of factors influence the students’ motivation in learning English. The subject of this research was the second year students of SMA DARUL HIKMAH Mataram.
1.6 Significance of study
            Thus hopefully, the result of this investigation could be applied by both teachers and students and other education institutions in motivating the students to learn English and also to improve the quality of teaching and learning English. So, the students would be able to use either spoken or written English on the next level of education such as senior high school and even university.


1.7 Definition of Key terms
To avoid misunderstanding and misinformation on the side of the readers, it was necessary to define the key terms in this study were as follows;
1. Motivation
According to Keller, motivation refers to “the choice people make as to what experiences or goals they will approach or avoid, and the degree or effort they will exert in that expect” (Keller, 1983).
Motivation, “the process whereby goal-directed activity is instigated and sustained” (Pintrich & Schunk, 2002), is one of the keys that influence the rate and success of language learning (Dorney, 1998).
2. Learning
Learning is the lifelong process of transforming information and experience into knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes
Many cognitive psychologist, who focus on the change in knowledge, believe that learning is an internal mental activity that cannot be observed directly, it only can be observed from the activities which are done by the learner in getting an information or knowledge, such as reading, listening, or showing his attention toward the certain object.


3.   The second year students
        The second year students of SMA DARUL HIKMAH Mataram in Academic year 2011/2012

CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1 Motivation in Learning
According to Zhang Rui1, FU Liang2 (2008) in his article, motivation was divided into two basic types: intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation.
            1. Intrinsic motivation
Intrinsic motivation is raised up from the students themselves when they were born and it is raises factually when it is needed. Intrinsic motivation reflects the desire to do something because it is enjoyable. If we are intrinsically motivated, we would not be worried about external rewards such as praise or awards. If we are intrinsically motivated, the enjoyment we experience would be sufficient for us to want to perform the activity in the future.
            2. Extrinsic motivation
         Extrinsic motivation comes from outside the students themselves. Extrinsic motivation reflects the desire to do something because external rewards such as award, money and praise. People who are extrinsically may not enjoy certain activities. They may only wish to engage in certain activities because wish to receive some external reward. There are three aspects of extrinsic motivation, namely:

a. Parent aspect
Parent of the students play important role to stimulate their children in learning English.
b. Peers aspect
Friend also can stimulate the students in study, the students who has friend with high motivation in study will bring good effect to their interest in learning.
c. Environment aspect
Environment in which the students live can stimulate the students to study English better. The students who live in big town, in which there are many library, there are many book stores, and other equipment that can complete the students need will has effect on students’ motivation.
B. The Previous Study on the Students’ Motivation in Learning English
Al-Tammy, A. (2009) has investigated Petroleum Engineering students’ motivation and attitudes towards learning the English language. The study investigated students’ motivation in terms of three motivational constructs: instrumental motivation, integrative motivation and personal motivation based on Gardner’s (1985) and Cooper and Fishman’s (1977) works. To achieve this objective, two research tools were used namely, questionnaire and interviews. The target students’ population in this study was all the students who studied in the academic year 2006-2007 in the Department of Petroleum Engineering (DPE) at HUST, Yemen. The total number of the students was 191 males. The data collected in the present study was of two types i.e. quantitative and qualitative. For the students’ motivation, the results showed that instrumental motivation was the primary source of the petroleum engineering students’ motivation toward learning the English language. Personal reasons were also regarded as important motives to the students. However, in regards to the integrative reasons, the results provided evidence that learning English to be part of the culture of its people had the least impact in students’ English language motivation.
Carreira, J.M. (2006) has investigated a combination of motivation and foreign language anxiety among Japanese university students. The participants were 91 sophomores majoring in English at a women’s private college in Japan. The main purpose was to investigate the relationship between motivation for EFL and foreign language anxiety. This study indicates that students who have practical reasons and intellectual satisfaction tend to have lower levels of foreign language anxiety. Although this study did not reveal strong correlations between motivation and foreign language anxiety, it would be unwise to conclude that motivation and foreign language anxiety do not interact. Further research is needed to explore possible links between motivation and foreign language anxiety. The results of the current study suggest that foreign language anxiety is only related to a small extent to motivation, and then the low level of variance explained suggests that other variables play more important roles.
Chen, W.C.D. (2008) has to investigate some freshmen cadets’ orientations of motivation on English learning. The result showed that the Linguistic self-confidence orientation got the highest score. To obtain the data, this research utilized statistical means of descriptive statistics. There were 61 subjects in total participating. The limit of this research is that the study was conducted at a military academy in southern Taiwan. The finding will not be applicable to the orientations of other students’ motivation on learning English in Taiwan. However, this study provides a general perspective towards the orientations of some freshman cadets’ motivation on English learning. For the in-depth discussion, further interviews with cadets or even with teachers toward the motivational aspect of students’ English learning will be recommended.
Kam, C.K.M. (2006) tries to identify the factors affecting the second language acquisition and their relative contribution to the determination of language learning outcomes. Participants were drawn 247 students attending week-end Chinese schools in Sydney. 628 students were drawn from 17 classes; 10 classes from primary school and 7 classes from secondary schools. Participants were also required to attempt short tests in Chinese and English, the performances were captured as Chinese and English scores. Each participant was asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 65 items together with a self-perception rating of English performance in four domains, namely, reading, writing, listening and speaking. After collection of the questionnaires, participants were asked to attempt English and Chinese papers to assess their language proficiency. They were validated assessment instruments gauging the students’ language proficiency. The opinion data from questionnaires were subjected to factor analyzed using SPSS package with Principal Axis Factoring to determine the factor structures, followed by confirmatory factor analysis using LISREL package to ascertain the scales for latent variables. The relationship between goals and motivation was not significant. The present study represents an initial attempt to describe the relationship between the motivational attitudes and the second language learning for ethnic Chinese students in Sydney.
Kasami, N. (2006) tries to identify motivational enhancements in the Bulletin Board System (BBS)-based intercultural exchange project. The exchange project was carried out by the 386 students of 14universities in 9 countries, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Brazil, Indonesia, UAE, Burkina Faso, Mexico, and Namibia in 2005. This research deals with Japanese student’s motivation for English and culture learning systematically in terms of Keller’s ARCS Model of Motivational Design. Based on analyses of questionnaires and English tests, it is indicated that the exchange project sustained students’ motivation for learning and enhanced students’ English writing and intercultural communicative competence.
Kimura, Y., Nakata, Y., & Okumura, T. (2001) explore the types of language learning motivation possessed by Japanese EFL learners from diverse learning milieus. Research on L2 motivation has long been conducted within the paradigm of social psychology. However, the revival of interest in L2 motivation in the 1990s shows a clear shift to an educational focus in which L2 learners’ cognitive, affective characteristics and classroom considerations have become major areas of concern. Following this trend, the present study employed a 50-item motivational questionnaire based on several motivational components from educational and social psychology. The questionnaire was administered to 1,027 participants from various learning contexts. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed six motivational factors and the follow-up multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated that some factors are characteristic of certain language learning milieus, while others are common to all situations. The results are discussed in terms of the motivational characteristics of EFL learners in Japan.
Liu, M. (2007) has investigated Chinese university students’ attitudes towards and motivation to learn English and the correlations of the said variable with the students’ English proficiency. The participant was 202 third-year students (51 female and 151 males) in six classes were randomly selected for the study in a southern university in China. The result of this study revealed that the students who had more positive attitudes toward learning English tended to score higher in the proficiency test and that the students who were more instrumentally or travel motivated tended to perform better in the test and both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations contribute to the learning of a second/foreign language. Other research methods such as interviews and reflective journal can be employed to supplement the survey so that the change or differences in attitudes and motivation among students can be explained.
Man_fat, M.W. (2004) focuses on the relationship between integrative motivations an L2 achievement among Chinese L2 learners in Hong Kong. Integrative motivation has been found to be correlated number of factors, such as perservance and classroom behaviors, in addition to L2 achievement. Therefore, having a deeper understanding of the relationship between integrative motivation and L2 linguist achievement in Hong Kong allows teachers, curriculum planners and policy makers to improve teaching practices and polices.
Rui1, Z., & Liang2, F. (2008) have aim to put forward the motivation theories and their implications in language teaching, meanwhile studies the motivational factors and presents several motivational strategies. Questionnaire survey is to be conducted among the adult non-English learners in Xingjian Normal University in order that non-English learners’ motivation and motivational factors could be generally identified. Statistical data analysis is to be done after the survey and the factors affecting the non-English adult learners’ English study are expected to be exposed to the readers. Based on the analysis of the data and statistics, some practical implications are provided. The purpose of this essay is to cope with the following two research questions: (1) What motivates the non-English learners to study English and how? (2) What can be done to enhance non-English learners’ motivation in learning English? 60 learners with ages from 20 to 35, selected randomly from the Law Department and Economics Department, Xingjian Normal University took part in the quantitative questionnaire survey. They have been studying in the university for 2 years. Among the subjects, 42 were females and 18 were males. They at least have learned English for 8 years. In conclusion, through the research work, it is easy for us to detect that there are some problems in existence in adult learners’ English learning, in particular, the low motivation in language learning. However, if we adopt the right way to arouse their motivation and prompt them to learn, they would make great progress in learning and upgrade the level of English study.
Vaezi, Z. (2008) describes and examines Iranian's undergraduate students' integrative and instrumental motivation toward learning as a foreign language. In the study, 79 non-major students from the Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) were selected to complete a questionnaire reflecting their motivation for learning. In order to determine the students’ tendency towards the two kind of motivation a modified 25-item survey was administered to undergraduate students in a university located in east of Iran. The results have shown that Iranian students had very high motivation and positive attitudes towards learning and they were more instrumentally motivated. Finally, based on the findings some suggestions and recommendations for teachers have been highlighted.

Wong, R.M.H. (2008) has investigated how gender differences place impact on a group of Chinese immigrant students’ motivation to learn English. This study aimed to investigate how Chinese immigrant students’ motivation in relations to age differences affected the teaching and learning of English as a second language. The questionnaire included items on different motivational constructs at different levels, based on the conceptual framework mentioned in the last section. Data collected from the questionnaire was analyzed using SPSS. Descriptive analyses were mainly used to project participants’ motivation and learning strategies for English learning. Chinese immigrant students were found to have stronger motivation to learn English, as they grow older, especially for a group of Chinese immigrant students who are over 16 years old. While for those who are less than 15 years old, their motivation to learn English tend to be weaker. According to both quantitative and qualitative results, both pointed at a direction that older Chinese immigrant students have stronger sense of self-efficacy in dealing with a difficult task in comparison with the younger ones. Older Chinese immigrant students tended to believe that paying sufficient effort could lead to academic success and they had stronger confidence in their study methods while the younger Chinese immigrant students were still searching for a good way to learn English in Hong Kong.
Wu, M.V., & Wu, P.H.N. (2008) use quantitative methodology to explore the perceptions of students at a Taiwanese technical university concerning its EFL learning environment in three aspects the physical environment, instructional arrangements, and social interaction. The paper concludes with recommendations by the researchers for improving practice. The participants were 593 freshman students selected from the population using a two-stage random sampling procedure, it takes place in Taiwan. The researchers used the software SPSS to analyze the quantitative data. The result of this study revealed that students had a low motivation and it indicates a neutral impression of their own motivation. This study more contact with native speakers. If instructors are not able to bring foreigners to the classroom, they could assign students to conduct their own interviews with foreigner living in the community.
Yihong, G., Yuan, Z., Ying, C., and Yan, Z. (2007) have investigated the relationship between English learning motivation types and self-identity changes among university students in the People’s Republic of China. The sample obtained from a stratified sampling consisted of 2,278 undergraduates from 30 universities in 29 regions. The instrument was a Likert-scale questionnaire which included 30 items of motivation types based on free responses, and 24 items of self-identity changes in six predefined categories: self-confidence, subtractive, additive, productive, split, and zero changes. An exploratory factor analysis revealed seven motivation types: intrinsic interest, immediate achievement, individual development, information medium, going abroad, social responsibility, and learning situation. A canonical correlation test found that motivation types and self-identity changes were correlated through four pairs of canonical variables. Among these, intrinsic interest was correlated with productive and additive changes, individual development with self-confidence change, social responsibility with productive and split changes. Theoretical and pedagogical implications of the results are discussed.
One of the most general and well-known distinctions in motivation theories is that of intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation. Deci (1985) defined intrinsic motivation. Intrinsically motivated activities deal with behavior performed for its own sake in order to experience pleasure and satisfaction, such as the joy of doing a particular activity or satisfying one’s curiosity. According to Vallerand (1983) and his colleagues , there are three subtypes of intrinsic motivation: (1) to learn (engaging in an activity for the pleasure and satisfaction of understanding something new, satisfying one’s curiosity and exploring the world); (2) towards achievement (engaging in an activity for the satisfaction of surpassing oneself, coping with challenges and accomplishing or creating something); (3) to experience stimulation (engaging in an activity to experience pleasant sensations). For extrinsically motivated behavior, on the other hand, is carried out in anticipation of a reward from outside and beyond the self, such as passing an exam, obtaining financial rewards and even certain type of positive feedback are likely to be extrinsic. According to Deci and Ryan (1985), there are four types of extrinsic motivation in existence: (1) External regulation refers to the least self-determined form of extrinsic motivation, coming entirely from external sources such as rewards or threats; (2) Interjected regulation involves externally imposed rules that the student accepts as norms to be followed in order not to feel guilty; (3) Identified regulation occurs when the person engages in an activity because he or she highly values and identifies with the behavior, and sees its usefulness; (4) Integrated regulation is the most developmentally advanced form of extrinsic motivation, involving optional behavior that is fully assimilated with the individual’s other values and needs.
On account of the various educational, social and psychological backgrounds, language learners vary in each other and learners’ differences influence their studying outcomes. Of all these differences, eight have been mainly focused and discussed. Respectively they are motivation, intelligence, aptitude, personality, age, sex, first language and learning strategies (Ellis, 1997). Of the eight differences mentioned above, motivation plays an essential part in language learning, Skehan (1989) points out that motivation is the second most powerful factor in forecasting language learning effects and it is only after aptitude. For motivation determines the degree of effort the language learners make in learning foreign language. The more motivation they have, the positive attitude they would adopt and the more efforts they would make in learning the target language.
In conclusion, integrative orientation or intrinsic motivation plays a more important role in second/foreign language learning than instrumental or extrinsic motivation.
With reference to the above review, the writer want to find out the students’ motivation in learning English and to identify the factors that influence the students’ motivation in learning English at SMA DARUL HIKMAH Mataram.

CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 Research Design
This study conducted with descriptive qualitative method which adapts Vaezi, Z (2008) combine with writer method to analyze the data. Method of this study was used to describe the motivation of second year students of SMP 4 Mataram in Learning English.
3.2 Population and Sampling Technique
Regarding of the population, arikunto said if the population is less than 100 people, we can take all the population as the subject of the research. If the number of population is more than one hundred, we can take 10%-15% or 20%-25% of the population for the subject of the study. The number of population is representative enough for the subject of the research. (arikunto : 1991:107).
The population in this research is the motivation of the second years students of SMA DARUL HIKMAH MATARAM, all students are 31 students as a population.
No.
Class
Population
1.
VIII BIL
30
2.
VIII1
36
3.
VIII2
36
4.
VIII3
36
5.
VIII4
37
6.
VIII5
35
7.
VIII6
37

TOTAL
247


3.2.2 Samples
In this research, the numbers of population were 247 students. According to  Arikunto (2006) “if the population is less than 100, it is suggested taking all as sample, but if they are more than 100, we can take only 10-15%, 20-25%, 30-35%, etc”. Because the number of students was more than 100, the writer takes only 10 % of 247 students.
No.
Class
Samples
1.
VIII BIL
3
2.
VIII1
4
3.
VIII2
4
4.
VIII3
4
5.
VIII4
4
6.
VIII5
4
7.
VIII6
4

TOTAL
27
                       
3.3 Data Collection Procedure
This study was tried to find out the motivation of the second year students of SMPN 4 Mataram. The writer was used the questionnaire technique for this research. The data were obtained through spreading out questionnaires for the second year students of SMPN 4 Mataram. The researchers adapted and modified these questions from Al-Tamimi, A. (2009), Liu, M (2007), Rui1, Z., & Liang2, F.(2008) and Vaezi, Z.(2008). Questionnaires were translated in Indonesian to make easy for the participants who were investigation according to Al-Tamimi who did investigation in Arab and translated questionnaire into Arabic. The questionnaire consists of 30 items divided into two parts, the first part contain of the students intrinsic motivation while the second part of questionnaire related the students extrinsic motivation. Every question has choice of “YES” and ”NO”.
3.4 Data Analysis Procedure
                  After collected through questionnaires the data was then analyzed based on the steps below:
1.      Spread out the questionnaire which consists of 30 statements.
2.      Identifying the answer from the questionnaire. This means that the answer will be grouped into “YES” and “NO”.
3.      List the answers. How many students answer “YES” and how many of them answering “NO” for the whole question. The answer will be drawn into a table for the easiness in computing.
4.      Percentage the data to find the result.
5.      Clarify the percentage.
6.      Take conclusion.

 CHAPTER IV
DATA ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION

4.1 Data Analysis 
As the writer stated in previous chapter, the data gathered were classified. In this chapter some motivations with the same categories were isolated and analyzed as the influencing to student’s English learning.
There were two categories of students motivation considered to analyze. They are intrinsic and extrinsic motivation on the second year of SMPN 4 Mataram.
4.1.1 The Student’s Intrinsic Motivation Result
Motivation
Yes
No
You learn English because of your own desire
89%
11%
You learn English because you really like English subject
59%
41%
You learn English because you are interested in mastering it
93%
7%
You learn English with pleasure
78%
22%
You learn English outside of school as well
15%
85%
You learn English diligently
67%
33%
You learn English because you want to master about the structure of English
89%
11%
You learn English because you want to master as much as possible English vocabularies
96%
4%
You learn English because you want to be brighter in writing and reading in English
100%
0%
You learn English because you are really interested with English books
70%
30%
You learn English because you like to listen news paper or English songs
81%
19%
You learn English because you want to be able to speak English fluently
96%
4%
You learn English in order to be able to communicate with foreign people/native speaker
85%
15%
You learn English because you want to continue your study on abroad
63%
37%
You learn English because you want to be an English teacher
59%
41%

Table above shows student’s response for intrinsic motivations aspect in learning English. The intrinsic motivations related to “You learn English because of your desire”, 24 students (89%) stated “YES” and 3 students (11%) stated “NO”. Towards the second motivation “You learn English because you really like English subject”, 16 students (59%) stated “YES” and 11 students (41%) stated “NO”. Towards the third motivation “You learn English because you are interested to master it”, 25 students (93%) stated “YES” and 2 students (7%) stated “NO”. Toward the fourth motivation “You learn English with pleasure”, 21 students (78%) stated “YES” and 6 students (22%) stated “NO”. While motivation number five “You learn English outside of school as well”, 4 students (15%) stated “YES” and 23 students (85%) stated “NO”.
Furthermore there more 18 (67%) of students’ stated “YES” on motivation number 6 and 9 students (33%) stated “NO”, while 24 students (89%) stated “YES” and 3 students (11%) stated “NO” on motivation number 7. On motivation number 8, 26 students (96%) stated “YES” and 1 student (4%) stated “NO”. On number 9 that 27 (100%) of the students’ answered “YES”. While on motivation number 10, 19 (70%) of students’ stated “YES” and 8 students (30%) stated “NO”. Then, on motivation on number 11, 22 students (81%) answered “YES” and 5 students (19%) answered “NO”. There were 26 students (96%) of students’ stated “YES” on motivation number 12 and 1 student (4%) stated “NO”. It is also found the motivation number 13, 23 students (85%) stated “YES” and 4 students (15%) stated “NO”. In addition in relation to motivation number 14, there were 17 students (63%) stated “YES” and 10 students (37%) stated “NO”. And then, 16 (59%) of students’ answered “YES” and 11 students (41%) answered “NO”.    
Observing closer the table, it was explicitly that the second year students’ of SMPN 4 Mataram have intrinsic motivation in learning English at school. It was proved that there were 15 intrinsic motivational statements offered to the students were chosen positively. Another word, a great part of the students’ answered “YES” instead of disagrees “NO” of those inner motivation statements offered to them. Take for example there were 27 (100%) students want to be able to write and read English.

Motivation
Yes
No
You learn English because of forced by your friends
11%
89%
You learn English because you posses a friend from abroad
11%
89%
You learn English in order to get award in English competition
4%
96%
You learn English because you are afraid not to pass in English
48%
52%
You learn English because you like west culture
26%
74%
You learn English because it is a main subject at school
89%
11%
You learn English because of forced by your parents
11%
89%
You learn English in order to receive good value
89%
11%
You learn English because of forced by your teacher
11%
89%
You learn English to compete in globalization era
63%
37%
You learn English in order to understand English television program
74%
26%
You learn English in order to understand English magazine and English news paper
56%
44%
You learn English because it is an international language
89%
11%
You learn English in order to get respect full from your friends
11%
89%
You learn English in order that you get a job easily
100%
0%

























Another evidence showed that 24 (89%) students want to master about the structure of English, and 26 (96%) of them want to master as much as possible English vocabularies.
However, the students probably do not like to study English because there were still studying at school and do not like studying at home, join in course, not have an appreciation in English, etc. These can be seen from table above that there were 4 (15%) of the students’ agreed or chose “YES” on the statement number 5” You learn English out of school as well”.
4.1.2 The Student’s Extrinsic Motivation Result

Table above showed that student’s responses for extrinsic motivations aspect in learning English. The extrinsic motivation related to “You learn English because of forced by your friends”, 3 students (11%) stated “YES” and 24 students (89%) stated “NO”. Toward the motivation no. 17 “You learn English because you posses a friend from abroad”, 3 students (11%) sated “YES” and 24 students (89%) stated “NO”. Toward the motivation no. 18 “You learn English in order to get award in English competition”, 7 (26%) of students’ answered “YES” and 20 students (74%) answered “NO”. There were 13 (48%) of students’ stated “YES” on motivation no. 19 and 14 students (52%) stated “NO”. Toward the motivation no.20 “You learn English because you like west culture”, 7 (26%) of students’ answered “YES” and 20 students (74%) answered “NO”. Toward the motivation no.21 “You learn English because it is a main subject at school”, 24 students (89%) stated “YES” and 3 students (11%) stated “NO”.
Furthermore, there were 3 (11%) of students stated “YES” and 24 (89%) stated “NO” on motivation no. 22. Moreover, 24 students (89%) stated “YES” and 3 students (11%) stated “NO” on motivation no. 23. It also found that 3 (11%) of students answered “YES” and 24 students (89%) answered “NO” on motivation no. 24. Then, 17 (63%) of students stated “YES” and 10 students (37%) stated “NO” on motivation no. 25. It also found that 20 (74%) of students answered “YES” and 7 students (26%) answered “NO” on motivation no. 26. There were 15 students (56%) stated “YES” and 12 (44%) stated “NO” on motivation no. 27 (You learn English in order to understand English magazine and English news paper). In addition, in relation to motivation “You learn English because it is an international language”, there were 24 (89%) of students stated “YES” and 3 students (11%) stated “NO”. While motivation no. 29 relating to “You learn English in order to get respect full from your friends”, there were 3 students (11%) answered “YES” and 24 students (89%) answered “NO”. Finally, 27 (100%) of students answered “YES”.  
Observing closer the table, it was explicitly that the second year students of SMPN 4 Mataram had extrinsic motivation in learning English at school. It was proved that there were fifteen extrinsic motivation statements offered to the students were chosen negatively. Another word, a great part of the students answered “NO” instead of agrees “YES” of those extrinsic motivational statements offered to them. For example, there were 24 (89%) students want to learn English because of forced by their teacher.
Another evidence showed that 24 students (89%) want to learn English because of forced by their parents, and 24 students (89%) want to learn English to get respect full from their friends. However, the students probably want to learn English in order to get award, it can be seen from table on the statement no.18 “You learn English in order to get award in English competition”.
In brief, the students’ motivation to study English was divided into two types. They were intrinsic and extrinsic motivations that have a close related with students’ ability in learning English. As what was researched with data of class VIII shown that they had a motivation in studying English.
4.2  Discussion
From the in-depth observation the writer found that second year students’ motivation had several differences which were influenced by two factors that were intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. It is similar to Liu,M’s (2007) statement in her study that intrinsic and extrinsic motivations contribute to the learning of a second/foreign language and also stated by Skehan (1989) that motivation plays an essential part in language learning.
The table showed that second year students of SMPN 4 Mataram had intrinsic motivation in learning English at the school. It was proved that there were intrinsic motivation statements offered to the students were chosen positively. Another word, a great part of the students answer  “Yes” of those intrinsic motivation statements offered to them. For example there were 27 (100%) students wanted to be able to write and read English. The table also shows that second year students of SMPN 4 Mataram had extrinsic motivation in learning English at the school. It was proved that there were fifteen extrinsic motivations statements offered to the students were chosen negatively. Another word, a great part of the students answered “No” instead of agrees “Yes” of those extrinsic motivation statements offered to them. For examples there were 24 students (89%) want to learn English because of force. It is different from Hao, Liu & Hao, (2004) stated that Chinese students are often highly motivated to study English. In brief, the students of SMPN 4 Mataram had high motivation.
In addition, the tables revealed that the students’ intrinsic motivation had more essential role than the extrinsic motivation, it was similar to Gardner et al.,(1987); Gardner et al., (1989); Noels et al., (2001) stated that integrative orientation or intrinsic motivation plays a more important role in second/foreign language learning than instrumental or extrinsic motivation. But it may not be true in all learning situations. According to Vaezi, Z (2008) in his study has found that Iranian students had very high motivation and positive attitudes towards learning and they were more instrumentally motivated and also stated by Liu, M (2007) in her article that as China’s economy is developing fast and Chinese people are in more contact with those from other cultures in various ways (such as attending conferences, studying and traveling), English is becoming more important. It plays a major role in determining what university middle school graduates can choose and in selecting college graduates for further education. It is also an influential factor in deciding what jobs and salaries people can get in the job market.

CHAPTER V
CONCLUSION AND SUGGESTION

5.1  Conclusion
            The research reveals that there were various motivations in the second year students of SMPN 4 Mataram in academic year 2009/2010 in learning English at the second class. Some of them had intrinsic motivations and extrinsic motivations. The intrinsic motivations were statements numbers 1-15. Motivation number 9 was 27 (100%) of the students agreed “Yes” of learning English because they want to be able to write and read English.
            Moreover, there were extrinsic motivations. The extrinsic motivations were statement numbers 16-30. Motivation number 16 was 24 (89%) of the students disagreed “No” to learn English because of forces from their friends. Statements number 22 was 24 (89%) of the students disagree “No” to learn English because of forces from their parents. Finally, motivation number 24 was 24 (89%) of the students disagree “No” to learn English because of forces from their teacher.

            The level of students’ motivation can be divided into several categories, such as:
1.      High Motivations Category
                  The high motivation of the students can be measured from their answer of “Yes” that shown in the questionnaires. The number of students that are included into this category is about 80% to 100%.
2.      Medium Motivations Category
                  The students who refer to this category are those who answer the questionnaires “Yes” about 60% to 79%.
3.      Low Motivations Category
                  The students that categorized into low motivations are those who answer the questionnaires about 0% to 59%.
            Among those three kinds of motivations above were influenced by intrinsic motivations that appear from the learners themselves and the other one was influenced by extrinsic motivations which the factors were out of learners’ mind or those were influenced by their environment.
            In this case, the students were more intrinsically than extrinsically motivated to learn English, which was different from Liu,M (2007) claim that the students were more instrumentally or extrinsically than integratively or intrinsically motivated to learn English.


5.2  Suggestions
            Observing the conclusion above, it was provided some suggestions to the students, teacher and parents are as follows:
a.       Students
-       Should be able to have an interest to learn English in improving their motivation.
-          The students hoped to keep their motivation which is important for their learning activities.
b.      Teachers
-          Teachers have to observe the students intrinsic and extrinsic motivations because those are the basic that influence their interest in learning, and always tell the students the advantages of English to increase their interest in learning English.
-          Bearing in mind the importance of students’ motivation and attitude in the success or failure in learning teaching process. Teachers have to accommodate and anticipate it by improving and developing the teaching strategies those later enable students to take part actively in the class.
c.       Parents
-          The parents must care of their children motivations. The parents have to support their children to learn more (intrinsic motivation), and also reserve their motivations with many things connected with their needs. For example: in learning English children need dictionary, tape recorder etc and also join with English course (extrinsic motivation).
-          The parents should give more attention to their children motivation as unique individual with specific capability, strength, limitation and weakness. The parents should also make children feel loved and needed by giving positive evaluation on their abilities and not enforcing them to fulfill all their expectations without considering their abilities.


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THE SECOND YEAR STUDENTS’ MOTIVATION IN LEARNING ENGLISH AT SMPN 4 MATARAM IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2009/2010

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